Prograf

What is the most important information I should know about Prograf?

Prograf
  • Do not consume grapefruit or grapefruit juice during treatment with Prograf unless your doctor specifically directs otherwise. Prograf can interact with grapefruit and grapefruit juice, and the interaction may have dangerous effects.
  • Increased susceptibility to infection and the possible development of lymphoma (cancer of the immune system) may result from the use of an immunosuppressant such as Prograf. Discuss these risks with your doctor and avoid sources of infection.
  • Notify your doctor immediately if you develop frequent urination, increased thirst or hunger, unusual bleeding or bruising, mouth sores, abdominal pain, pale stools, darkened urine, a cough, sore throat, fever, chills, or swelling of glands. These symptoms could be early signs of dangerous side effects.
  • Tell your doctor and dentist that you are taking this medication before having surgery, starting any other medicines, or receiving any vaccinations.

What is Prograf?

  • Prograf is an immunosuppressant. Immunosuppressants decrease the effects of your body’s immune system.
  • Prograf is used to prevent your body from rejecting a liver or kidney transplant. It is usually combined with a steroid medication.
  • Prograf may also be used for purposes other than those listed in this medication guide.

Who should not take Prograf?

Prograf 1 mg
  • Before taking Prograf, tell your doctor if you
     have kidney disease;
    · have liver disease;
    · have a viral, bacterial, or fungal infection;
    · have epilepsy or another seizure disorder;
    · have diabetes;
    · have high blood pressure;
    · have any other serious or chronic medical condition; or
    · are taking potassium supplements (e.g., K-Dur, Klor-Con) or potassium-sparing diuretics such as amiloride (Midamor), spironolactone (Aldactone), or triamterene (Dyrenium, Dyazide, Maxzide).
  • You may not be able to take Prograf, or you may require a dosage adjustment or special monitoring if you have any of the conditions listed above.
  • Prograf is in the FDA pregnancy category C. This means that it is not known whether Prograf will harm an unborn baby. Do not take this medication without first talking to your doctor if you are pregnant.
  • Prograf passes into breast milk and may affect a nursing infant. Prograf is not recommended for use during breast-feeding. Do not take this medication without first talking to your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.
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How should I take Prograf?

  • Take Prograf exactly as directed by your doctor. If you do not understand these directions, ask your doctor, nurse, or pharmacist to explain them to you.
  • Take each dose with a full glass of water.
  • Prograf is usually taken twice a day. Follow your doctor’s instructions.
  • Do not consume grapefruit or grapefruit juice during treatment with Prograf unless your doctor specifically directs otherwise. Prograf can interact with grapefruit and grapefruit juice, and the interaction may have dangerous effects.
  • Your doctor may want you to have regularly scheduled blood tests while taking Prograf.
  • Store Prograf at room temperature away from moisture and heat.

What happens if I miss a dose?

  • Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the dose you missed, and take only your next regularly scheduled dose. Do not take a double dose of this medication unless otherwise directed by your doctor.
  • Notify your doctor if you miss a dose of this medication.

What happens if I overdose?

  • Seek emergency medical attention.
  • Symptoms of a Prograf overdose are not known.

What should I avoid while taking Prograf?

  • Increased susceptibility to infection and the possible development of lymphoma (cancer of the immune system) may result from the use of an immunosuppressant such as Prograf. Discuss these risks with your doctor and avoid sources of infection.
  • Do not consume grapefruit or grapefruit juice during treatment with Prograf unless your doctor specifically directs otherwise. Prograf can interact with grapefruit and grapefruit juice, and the interaction may have dangerous effects.
  • Tell your doctor and dentist that you are taking this medication before having surgery, starting any other medicines, or receiving any vaccinations.
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What are the possible side effects of Prograf?

  • If you experience any of the following serious side effects, stop taking Prograf and seek emergency medical attention or contact your doctor immediately:
    · an allergic reaction (difficulty breathing; closing of your throat; swelling of your lips, tongue, or face; or hives);
    unusual tiredness or weakness;
    · cough, sore throat, fever, chills, or swelling of glands;
    · pain in the lower back or side;
    · painful or difficult urination;
    · a sudden unusual feeling of discomfort or illness; or
    · frequent urination or increased thirst or hunger.
  • Increased susceptibility to infection and the possible development of lymphoma (cancer of the immune system) may result from the use of an immunosuppressant such as Prograf. Discuss these risks with your doctor and avoid sources of infection.
  • Other, less serious side effects may also occur. Continue to take Prograf and notify your doctor if you experience
    · tremor;
    · headache;
    · diarrhea or constipation;
    · increased blood pressure;
    · insomnia;
    · numbness or tingling;
    · upset stomach, abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, or loss of appetite;
    · swelling of the feet or lower legs; or
    · itching or a rash.
  • Side effects other than those listed here may also occur. Talk to your doctor about any side effect that seems unusual or that is especially bothersome.

What other drugs will affect Prograf?

  • Before taking Prograf, tell your doctor if you are taking or need to take any of the following medicines:
    · potassium supplements (e.g., K-Dur, Klor-Con, others);
    · potassium-sparing diuretics, including amiloride (Midamor), spironolactone (Aldactone), and triamterene (Dyrenium, Dyazide, Maxzide);
    · other drugs that affect the kidneys, such as gentamicin (Garamycin), amikacin (Amikin), amphotericin B(Fungizone), cisplatin (Platinol), or cyclosporine (Neoral, Sandimmune);
    · the seizure medicines carbamazepine (Tegretol), phenobarbital (Luminal, Solfoton), and phenytoin (Dilantin);
    · antifungal medicines such as ketoconazole (Nizoral), itraconazole (Sporanox), and fluconazole (Diflucan);
    · calcium channel blockers (heart medicines) such as verapamil (Calan, Verelan), diltiazem (Cardizem, Dilacor XR, Tiazac), nifedipine (Adalat, Procardia), and nicardipine (Cardene);
    · erythromycin (Ery-Tab, E-Mycin, E.E.S., others), clarithromycin (Biaxin), or troleandomycin (TAO);
    · the AIDS medicines ritonavir (Norvir), indinavir (Crixivan), nelfinavir (Viracept), and saquinavir (Invirase);
    · bromocriptine (Parlodel);
    · cimetidine (Tagamet, Tagamet HB);
    · cisapride (Propulsid);
    · danazol (Danocrine);
    · metoclopramide (Reglan);
    · methylprednisolone (Medrol, others);
    · rifabutin (Mycobutin);
    · rifampin (Rifadin, Rimactane); or
    · any type of vaccination.
  • You may not be able to take Prograf, or you may require a dosage adjustment or special monitoring if you are taking any of the medicines listed above.
  • Drugs other than those listed here may also interact with Prograf. Talk to your doctor and pharmacist before taking any prescription or over-the-counter medicines.
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